Some of the most interesting things happening in 2013 was around recommender engines. Amazon.com won an Emmy for their video recommender and Netflix algorithms got mainstream coverage with every mention of the movie Sharknado. Also, Arjan Haring presented some interesting thoughts about social proof in framing of recommendations. Another interesting trend is more insights into the effects of user generated content like reviews and online comments. Sinan Aral demonstrated how reviewers are shaped by social contagion and the trend of shutting off comments is (thankfully) growing. On the less exciting side, last year I hoped for more insights into online loyalty and stickiness this year, but little surfaced in that regards. The only thing I noticed was an article by[…]

Understanding consumer psychology and online behavior has become essential and mainstream knowledge for e-commerce development in 2012.  While some of us might regret that the cat is out of the bag, it also means a lot of smart people are figuring out a lot of smart things.  Below are what I found to be the most insightful and actionable articles in 2012. There’s two things mostly missing: Recommender systems are still exclusively the domain of data crunching and algorithms, while I’d like to see more on inspiration and getting people out of the filter bubble. The other thing I haven’t seen much of in 2012 is any interesting work on stickiness and loyalty. If you follow my twitter feed, you’ve seen[…]

Trying to learn more about how emotion affects ecommerce, I came across the book “eMotion: Estimation of User’s Emotional State by Mouse Motions” by Wolfgang Maehr.  Basically, Wolfgang Maehr found that you can correlate certain types of mouse movements with emotional states.  Specifically, he found that mouse acceleration, deceleration, speed and uniformity could predict arousal, disgust/delight, and anger/contendedness, all in a sample of 39 participants. But… how is this not available to me in a handy javascript library?   I am just dreaming of reading off the emotional state of website visitors per page.  Or per blog post for that matter… If you know of anyone who has made any implementation of something like this, please please leave a comment![…]

I just want to share these very cool lists of cognitive biases.  It’s so useful to just have an overview of these on hand – and obviously I’m not the only one thinking so, as there are several useful collections out there: 50 Scientifically proven ways to be persuasive A Visual Study Guide To Cognitive Biases – They’re beautiful. Stephen Anderson’s Mental Notes cards: Get Mental Notes: It’s printed and in a leather box! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cognitive_biases – The plain overview The Psychologist View of UX Design. A less comprehensive, but still useful, list, by Susan Weinschenk UPDATE: Cognitive Bias survival guide – visually pleasing overview by GeekWrapped UPDATE: Wheel of Persuasion by Bart Schutz – hidden behind a login UPDATE: Cognitive[…]

The video recording of my talk from YAPC::NA on the Psychology of Perl is online.  It has a very funny beginning when Tatsuhiko Miyagawa walks into the room receiving standing ovations as I start my talk, which is really weird in the video. Still made for a fun start of the talk… I have to admit I haven’t watched the whole video myself, but word around is that people liked it. Which is motivating for putting together a larger, more detailed talk for a smaller interested audience, rather than a quick overview for a generally less-than-interested audience.

It turns out I’ve done to my blog what I swore not to: Stop updating it. However, I’ve also sworn that if I did I would come back to it and not give up. So what happened? Well, it’s been quiet here because the heat turned up a few notches in my day job, and the opportunities to actually apply psychological methods turned plentiful. I’ve been involved heavily in recruitment in a (the) major Perl employer these days, and while I’ve learnt plenty about the minds of computer programmers, I also find myself in the situation where there’s correspondingly little I can write about it. On one side because there’s limits to how much detail I can write about before[…]