As a programmer, you write for two very different kinds of readers. One is the rigid computer platform, the other is the human maintainers of your code. For the former we have quite conclusive guidelines on what works, but the latter is only consistent as a source of disagreement and uncertainty. Typically the guideline is “Always code as if the person who ends up maintaining your code is a violent psychopath who knows where you live.“, while most people end up writing as if the person maintaining the code is themselves. Neither approach is particularly good -I can’t imagine code written for violent psychopaths  would really be that great to maintain. And on the other end, a lot of coders[…]

I promised to explain better the idea of variable roles I mentioned in the previous post about natural programming. This is based on a finding by Finnish researcher Jorma Sajaniemi (published work), who discovered that 99% of variables in novice’s code can be categorized in to 11 different roles. These roles are variable uses every programmer will recognize: iterators, constants, flags and so on – although in role-terminology the names somewhat differ (steppers, fixed-values and one-way flags, for example).  Mr. Sajaniemi has also found that these roles matches tacit knowledge in expert programmers – i.e. the 11 roles are also typically intuitively recognized by expert programmers even if it is not explicit or active knowledge. Whether or not the same[…]